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Sean Penn’s New Book: Bob Honey Who Just Do Stuff

Sean Penn’s new book, Bob Honey Who Just Do Stuff is a unique perspective on humor written on the page. Rolling Stone Magazine describes it as ‘a piece of oddball Americana’ with a ‘loose narrative’ and a ‘satirical tone’. Sean Penn states that his novel is simply fiction, but so far a few leaked excerpts about Donald Trump and the #MeToo movement were misconstrued as factual.

Sean Penn has been an Oscar winning actor for Milk and Mystic River, producer and director of The Last Runner and director of The Last Face and Cape Town. Now, Penn is releasing his second novel that’s basically a work of controversial political satire. It’s a provocative piece of fiction that follows a middle-aged man who has a less-than-exciting job activities and one of them is selling septic tanks to Jehovah’s Witnesses.

In the book Bob Honey’s list of employment positions includes creating fireworks displays for dictators, which is crazy enough by itself, but he adds two additional positions: getting Hasidic Jews out of foreign prisons and assassinating the elderly with a mallet. This book adds yet another layer to the enigma that is Sean Penn. Penn choose to risk his life to interview the most wanted man in the world, El Chapo for Rolling Stone Magazine in the January, 2016 issue. His acting roles have also been challenging: he played a gay politician in Milk and a crazed murderer in Dead Man Walking.

Sean Penn has always been a master at his craft. His writing has the same signs of being unusual, but perhaps also masterful. The critics have pointed out that it does take a satirical look at one man’s view of culture in this country and many of the book’s excerpts have gone viral on social media, but the book is getting people to talk about it. Bob Honey Who Just Do Stuff is a self-assured text that accentuates the oddities in one man’s life. Through the eyes of Bob Honey, Penn guides the reader down a path that starts to look more and more like a forever widening path to someplace unfamiliar but somehow attractive and repelling at the same time.

Read the full review here:

http://time.com/5206110/sean-penn-book/

 

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