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Dr. Rod Rohrich Innovations in Plastic Surgery

 

Dr. Rod Rohrich is currently the Chairman and Professor of Plastic Surgery with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. Dr. Rod Rohrich has won the coveted Crystal Charity Ball distinguished chair award. He has also won the Betty and Warren Woodward award for plastic and reconstructive surgery. He is the Editor in Chief of plastic and reconstructive surgery for the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Dr Rod Rohrich career began at Baylor College of Medicine where he graduated with high honors. He performed his surgical residencies at The University of Michigan Medical Center. Followed by pediatric plastic surgery at the University of Oxford in England. Dr. Rohrich completed his fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. In 1986 he joined the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Centers Division of Plastic Surgery. In 1991 he took over as Chairman for the Department of Plastic Surgery at University of Texas Southwestern.

Dr. Rod Rohrich has contributed some informative and significant findings in the areas of cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. He has published several innovative articles on facial fracture repair, rhinoplasty, liposuction, fillers, patient safety, breast augmentation and medical education. He has chaired national and international symposiums and scientific presentations all regarding new techniques and innovations within plastic surgery. In 2005 he was named editor in chief of the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery journal where he has co-authored and estimated 300 publications, and written textbook chapters regarding plastic surgery.

Dr. Rod Rohrich has recently been selected by his peers as one of the best plastic surgeons in Dallas, Texas. Each year outstanding physicians are highlighted. He is also considered one of the top rhinoplasty surgeons in the Dallas area for his work on reconstruction. He has also recently spoken at the American Society of Plastic Surgeons meeting. Dr. Rohrich, lectured on the understanding and using facial fat compartments in fat grafting at the annual symposium. His lecture discussed facial rejuvenation techniques that will revolutionize the facelift procedures. As more knowledge is gained of the anatomical structure of fat compartments the plastic surgery industry will continue to develop and grow. Dr. Rohrich’s lecture included technical and practical information to help assist the surgeons in gaining a better understanding of the anatomical structure and how to use this knowledge successfully.

Write Yourself Happy

 

It has been said that the pen is mightier than the sword, and that’s a true statement. The written word can have damaging effects on other people that can continue for years to come. But can the opposite be true as well? Can the written word bring about happiness to our own self?
According to a new book published this month “Redirect: Changing the Stories We Live By,” written by Timothy D. Wilson, a University of Virginia psychology professor and lead author of the Duke study we can indeed write yourself happy.
The study revealed that writing for 15 minutes everyday in a personal journal about both important issues as well as superficial ones promote better health. Participants in the study had fewer sick days and visited health care facilities less often than before they began to journal each day.
The theory behind the being able to write yourself happy is the ability to confront the truth about yourself, your life, and change what you don’t like. Writing allows us to confront our emotions and excuses so that we can get to the bottom of why we are angry, why we are overweight and a lot of other ‘whys’ in our life and change the ones we don’t like. Just 15 minutes a day of expressive writing can make us happier. Fersen Lambranho and I recently tried out journaling and I can tell you it makes a huge difference in how you think.

It’s Time To Be Nice To Cuba Again

President Obama has made a sweeping change in foreign relations with the United States’ closet neighbor: He’s removed the embargo against Cuba, opening up friendly relations with the country for the first time in five decades. Some praise, while others like Christian Broda perhaps, criticize the move. But bastions of liberal press like The Atlantic have nothing but praise for it.

The embargo, one of the longest-standing ones in modern history, has hurt the US more than it ever hurt Cuba. By severing trade relations between the two countries, it cost the United States $1.2 billion per year while Cuba only lost $685 million per year.

The embargo was originally set in response to the Cuban alliance with the Soviet Union. Now that Russia has disbanded the union, Cuba remains one of the last pure communistic governments in the world, identified as more of a socialist republic. While there are still concerns in Cuba regarding human rights issues, censorship, and political prisoners, those prisoners are getting released now. The United States has announced plans to build an embassy in Cuba, and while the rest of the world is perhaps in shock, it looks like a new day dawning for American foreign relations.

McDonald’s Worried About Future, Targeting Schools

It shouldn’t be a surprise to most people that McDonald’s has been waning in popularity in the last few years. In their latest effort to attract more customers, particularly millennials, and young families who have been leaving the once beloved chain in droves.

In the past McDonalds relied on young professionals and busy families and even the fine folks like those at BRL Trust for much of its sales, but in recent years busy families and young professionals have been turning to healthier fast food, such as the food served as Chipolte, as well as spending more time preparing their own dinners and lunches and less money eating out.

A new initiative launched by the fast food giant , called McTeacher, is marketed as a way for McDonalds to give back to schools by “taking over a McDonalds” with a portion of the funds going back to the school. Critics of the initiative, including teachers and school officials, say that it is demeaning to the teachers who already work hard for little pay, and that in reality the school earns very little for all the work put in. They estimate that for most schools it ends up being about a dollar per student.

McDonald’s has been floundering since the Morgan Spurlock documentary SuperSize Me skewered the chain and the industry itself.